Episode 112: 6 Figures, Now What? with Allana Robinson

You got to your goal of 6-figures! So, what’s next?

As a business owner, you think alot about making it to 6 figures. You may spend years striving towards that goal, dreaming about what your 6 figure business will look like and how it will change your life. But what about after you reach that goal? Then what?

My client, Allana Robinson, is on the podcast today to share stories from her experience as an entrepreneur who hit that famous 6 figure mark, and what she had to figure out next. In this episode, we discuss how she was able to overcome overwhelm and manage her business in a different, sustainable way in order to keep growing.

If you’re at 6 figures and feeling overwhelmed and burnt out, there are opportunities for you to grow differently. In the Scale to Seven® Mastermind I’ll show you how you can make that leap from 6 figures to 7 figures without wondering what to do next.  Apply here

 

In This Episode You’ll Learn:

  • Why what gets you to 6 figures won’t get you to 7 figures
  • The importance of having systems in place to get to the next level
  • The importance of hiring objectively rather than emotionally
  • Why CEOs need to know their numbers

 

Featured on the Show:

Allana Robinson is a parenting coach who teaches parents of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers how to raise well-behaved kids without yelling, shaming, or time-outs. She teaches parents that tantrum-free shopping trips, peaceful bedtimes, and happy mealtimes are all within reach. It’s never too late, or too early, to stop the downward spiral and start enjoying your children again, with her proven tools and techniques.

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Kathryn Binkley  

Welcome to Scale to Seven®! Your behind-the-scenes look at what it really takes to scale your business to seven figures. I'm your host Kathryn Binkley, business and leadership coach for online entrepreneurs. Here's what I know, building a business that will generate millions requires the mindset, strategy, and action of a future seven-figure CEO, starting now. Ready to Scale to Seven®? Let's go!

Hello, everyone. Welcome back to the podcast. I am so excited today to introduce you to Allana Robinson. She is a parenting coach, I'm going to have her tell you all about what she does. And I want to talk about her experience becoming an entrepreneur, growing her business to six figures. And then what happened after. And I can't wait to dig into that. But first, let's just back up and let you tell everyone a little bit about you and your business.

Allana Robinson  

Yeah, so as you said, I'm a parenting coach. I'm an early childhood educator and I help parents who are at the end of their rope with their child's behavior, understand why their kids are misbehaving and how to fix it without yelling, shaming or timeouts. So I'm all about empowering parents as the expert on their own child, and implementing all of the new science that has come out about child development and how behavior develops and why children do what they do. And take that out of the theory sciency stuff and put it into real life in their everyday to solve the problems that are driving them off the wall. So that's what I do. And I do it through my membership program parents ability.

Kathryn Binkley  

So great. I know it's helped so many people in the age group that you work with specifically, will you share that as a whole? Yeah, two to six years old, such an important age. And, man, there's a lot that I could talk about there, this podcast for all about parenting, we would really dive in because definitely, I have some things I could share about my experience raising young kids. And anyway, if you want to hear more about that, you're gonna have to go check out Allana. And we'll tell you towards the end how you can connect with her and learn from her because it's definitely an important topic, one that needs to be a priority, even as you're growing your business if you have children, and she's the person to help you with it. But today, what I want to dive into with you is your experience growing your business, to six figures and beyond. And so first, I'd love for you to tell us a little bit about your journey, how you got your business started and how you kind of got to the six figure mark? 

Allana Robinson  

Yeah, I didn't start a business on purpose, which I think put me in a bit of a disadvantage because this wasn't an intentional thing. I started my business, I think a lot of people start their businesses out of necessity. But it wasn't a business venture. For me, it was a freelancing stopgap when I started, I just had my oldest child, I was on maternity leave, because I'm in Canada, and we get that nice year long maternity leave. And I was approached by the director of the agency that I had been working for before that and asked if I wanted to coach parents, because the funding had been cut. And they needed to redirect some of their funds. But some parents were really upset about that they wanted that high touch parent coach relationship that they couldn't provide anymore. So they started referring people to me, and I was just doing it on the side while I was on my mat leave. And by time I finished my mat leave, and my son was a year and a half old, I had so many clients that I didn't need to go back to work and my husband's in the military. And he was just about to get posted. So he was like, don't go back to work. Let's just keep doing this. And so we moved, I kept doing it remotely, it was working really, really well. But I was burning out because I had too many parents who needed help. And I could not take them all on like I just didn't have the time in my day to parent, my son, be present with him, do all the things that I needed to do. And also meaningfully interact with all of these clients and balance everything. And it was just getting too overwhelming. So at that point, tried to turn it into a course, which didn't not work but didn't work. It was, it worked in the sense that parents were really good at learning the basic information in that format, but it very quickly became apparent that they really needed that coaching relationship as well. So at that point, we kind of hybrided it and we created a course that had a live support component to it. And that worked really well except that it was like this one off fee and these parents were needing months and months and often years of support. And it wasn't financially feasible. So we may or may all made just me by myself decided to turn it into a membership model to get the cost down for parents and to make sure that I had that recurring revenue coming in. And that worked amazingly, it's still format that we're using. I'm using that there is a way now.

Kathryn Binkley  

Yeah, I can't wait to talk about that. 

Allana Robinson  

Not the royal way anymore. But so yeah, that's the format that we're still using. And it works really well. But it was just kind of like this has been called the comedy of errors, because it was, we're going to try one thing we're going to try another there was a lot of throwing spaghetti at the wall and hoping get stuck. And piecing things together piecemeal. And it was just the first six years has been kind of like, running on a treadmill, going full tilt, but you're not really getting anywhere.

Kathryn Binkley  

Right. So I think it's so relatable, though, because there are so many entrepreneurs who became entrepreneurs, not because of necessarily this, like big drive to start a business at first, but because they were experts at what they did. And it just lended itself towards that journey. So you started out like you were already an expert in this area, and then it turned into a business and your journey, like throwing things at the wall and trying things. That's so much of what's required in that first, you know, multiple years to get to six figures. And oftentimes it takes longer than people think to get to that first six figures.

Allana Robinson  

Oh, entirely. Like, I remember when we moved, and my husband was like, okay, so if you're not going to get a job here. And to be fair, there really aren't any jobs to have here. If you're not going to get a job here, then you need to actually start making money, like, consistently, and being like chips. Okay, I can't do that, I think and thinking that, like if I just put my nose to the grindstone and did it all properly, that, you know, by the end of the year, I'd be hitting six figures, no problem. And it didn't hit six figures for another five years, didn't mean I wasn't making money. I was making decent money. But I didn't hit six figures for almost five years. And I mean, I had another baby in there. So that's a little bit down, obviously. But yeah, it took a lot longer. And it's taking a lot longer now that we're at six figures to get further down that six better figure road then like, kind of been stuck on that hump for a while.

Kathryn Binkley  

Yeah. So let's first talk about those years leading up to six figures. What was your idea? What was the concept that you had of what six figures was going to be like, before you got there? Before you hit reality? What do you think it was gonna be like?

Allana Robinson  

I had no concept of the whole, like, more money more problems. Like, well, six figures, like, I remember, I don't remember who it was, I was following, but it was following one of those semi celebrity entrepreneurs and then being like, you know, I make $200,000. But I still only take home like $30,000 being like, Okay, you all are mismanaging your money. There's no, there's no way. And to be fair at the time like to that bringing home $2,000 was a huge deal to me. So it's like the idea that once you got to six figures that your take home wouldn't necessarily be six figures was not we're closer to six figures was not anywhere on my radar.

Kathryn Binkley  

Yeah, what did you think it was going to be like?

Allana Robinson  

I figured I'd take home at least half of that. And that, you know, once I was taking home, at least half of that, that other half was going to be going towards people who were able to really run the business for me, and I'd have to do is kind of show up and coach. And we're working towards that. But we're not there yet.

Kathryn Binkley  

And that's not typical to be there. By the time you get to six figures. And I asked the question I did, because I think like at some point, I remember very early in the time of us working together, it may have even been on your initial form. Like you said, like, I got to six figures now what like, that's kind of your question.

Allana Robinson  

It was, it was this like, pie in the sky goal, because I was, you know, a stay at home mom with two little baby boys. And I was like, wow, I could just get to six figures like the really successful people. You know, once you hit six figures that you've got something that converts and that is going to continue to convert and blah, blah, blah, I just had it in my head that by time I got to six figures, it was just a matter of like opening the faucet more and it would just keep getting stronger and stronger. And that's not necessarily the case.

Kathryn Binkley  

I remember very early in my business, also having this concept of what six figures would be like and thinking that that was the end goal. And when I got there, everything was gonna be great. And that's like the end game and it would be amazing. You know, like, that's it. Like, that's goal.

Allana Robinson  

I remember my CPA handing me the sheet that said that I'd made $100,000. And I was like, yeah, for like, five minutes. And then I was like, okay, cool. I see it on the paper, I believe that that has happened. But I guess I'm working towards seven figures now like, and for some reason, the gaps between zero to six, feel so much smaller than the gap from six to seven. And it is more money. But like, it's, it feels so then you're like, what needs to change at this point? Like, there's cuz like, you get to that $100,000. And you're like, Okay, well, that's, this isn't sustainable. Like you hustle your way to $100,000. But you cannot keep doing that. Because you're burnt out. And I did, I burned out hard. I did it in the middle of a pandemic. So between hustling to get that to that 100k mark, once I got close to it, and managing all that went around with locked down, and doing it with my kids still at home was like, what the fuck do I do now.

Kathryn Binkley  

And I think, again, like, so many people burn out. So many people hustle their way to six figures. And there's a season I think of like, again, just throwing spaghetti at the wall learning trying and that leads to hustle, because it's not clear. You're trying all the things just to figure it out. But then you get to six figures. And you're like, Okay, this, this isn't enough. Like the six figure number isn't everything I thought it was going to be it's not giving me the lifestyle I dreamt of when I started, which means I need to make more. But I can't make more the same way I made this money because I don't have any more time to do that.

Allana Robinson  

And I remember like, I remember looking around, like my life and my business and being like, Okay, this is a business now like, so you're hustling your way to 200,000. And once you get there, I was like, Oh, wait, this isn't my freelance gig. This isn't my side gig. This is what I do. And I am not a business person. I'm a parenting coach. And that's, I think when it really hit me, like, I don't know what the fuck I'm doing. 

 

Kathryn Binkley  

Okay, so was it at that point that you reached out to me or around that time? 

Allana Robinson  

Yeah, it was around that time, I talked to a few people who were beyond me and like, you're getting closer to seven figures and who I had kind of in my loose circle. And being like, what did you do? I mean, you got and I felt like an idiot. Because, like, what kind of question is that? I did. I said to someone, like, what what do I do now? What what had to change? To get you off of that? And they were like, well, and they hit most of them give me like this list as long as their arm and I was completely froze. Because I didn't know how to do any of those things. And yeah, you have this perception that the hustle part or the figuring things out part is kind of over by time you hit up your $1,000. And I was like, You mean, there's still shit to figure out? And I have to figure it out. So um, yeah, so I, I, at that point, I started like, looking at different people, because I'd had mentors that. And I'm sure everybody who's an entrepreneur, especially an online entrepreneur, right now, you have people you follow on Instagram and Facebook, and you're like, Oh, I'd like to work with them one day. And I realized that everybody who was on my timeline was either behind me at this point, like I'd already outgrown them, or they didn't drag with me in any way, shape, or form. So I was like, Who the hell do I follow now? Like, I need to complain, I felt like I needed to tear down my Facebook feed or my Instagram feed and start over. So they gave me some good people to follow when you were one of those names. And that's, I started listening to your podcast started following you on Instagram. And I was like, Okay, I like this girl.

Kathryn Binkley  

Yeah, and I'm so glad you reached out. I'm curious to like, the one of the first messages or the exchanges that we had in Instagram DMS at the time, because that's where I think you initially reached out to me. You said something about like, I'm juggling all of these glass balls, and something's going to drop. So tell me what those glass balls represented. And what were the responsibilities?

Allana Robinson  

Yeah, I don't remember where I heard the analogy originally. But there's this concept that like you have glass balls and you have plastic balls, and you're juggling all have the balls and the ones that you let, sometimes you have to let the plastic balls. And that's okay because they bounced out of plastic, you cannot let the glass balls fall. And I had been juggling so many balls for so long that I couldn't differentiate between the glass of the plastic balls anymore. I didn't know what I could hand off to other people, and what really needed to stay in my wheelhouse. And I didn't know where to find the people to hand the plastic balls to or some of the less fragile glass ones, too. And so I didn't, I felt like I was constantly spinning plates and juggling balls. And I just didn't know. I didn't know, because I'm not a business person becoming one, but.

Kathryn Binkley  

That's right. Yeah. And so you joined Scale to Seven, you joined the mastermind. And even like, as you're talking about, like becoming this business owner, like we talked about becoming a CEO, and really what that meant, and what do you, what to think about. And so I'm curious now, like, as you joined the mastermind and started to shift your focus, what are some of the things that you realized you needed to focus on to scale your business from six figures beyond that maybe you hadn't focused on before.

Allana Robinson  

I was said I was trying to do everything myself. And once you kind of pointed out what could be handed over to other people, because, right, when you're hustling, and you're a solopreneur, and you're all by yourself, you get this impression that you're the only one who can do your business. And there's nobody who could step into any of these roles. Because that would mean that you have to entrust someone else with your vision. And when you haven't articulated your vision to anyone, you don't have any standing of the standard operating procedures, you don't have any documentation whatsoever, like your business is completely in your brain, it seems completely impossible to hand those things, or anything over to anybody else. So you really helped me kind of flesh out like, what is an administrative task? What is something that I don't actually have to personally do? And what can I hand over to people who are going to do those things better than I can, especially because they're gonna give it their full attention. And I'm like, yeah, I gotta get this done. So I can handle all these other glass balls. So a lot of administrative will all pretty much all my administrative tasks have been handed over to team members. At this point, I've actually handed over some of my coaching to a co coach at this point, which I did since finishing Scale to Seven. Because I was right around Christmas, this year, I was burning out again, I was hitting a wall. And so I was finally bit the bullet and brought on a co coach to handle my clients a couple of days a week so that I can like sit and stare at a wall and not have to constantly be thinking about the business. I've been able to hand off a lot of my marketing to a marketing professional whose job it is. And she gives me a much reduced task list compared to what I was doing before. And then I fill out her requests and hand it back to her and she does the social media things. And so I've just taken a lot of anything other than like direct client interaction and improving my course and my program and my product off of my plate, and actually treating it like a business and having that documentation in place. And we just had some staff turnover where my assistant left. And so I had another two assistants or I did and one of them left, and it was so seamless, like before Scale to Seven, that would have sent me into a complete tailspin. And I would have ended up doing that person's job again, just because I wouldn't have had the brain space or the like ability to hand it over back to my other assistant. But because everything was documented, and like it was structured as a business, and I didn't even have a project management system hooked up, like literally everything was just in my brain. And I wrote it on a physical to do list every day. And then I message people if they had something to do, and that was how I was managing my very, very small team at that point. But now everything's documented and it's in a project management system. So literally taking that assistant out of the equation, I was able to just take all of her tasks and assign them to a new person. And the instructions were there. I didn't have to spend a month training her. My business is now structured like a business. It's not structured as me being the puppet master and handing over dribs and drabs and bits and pieces to other people.

Kathryn Binkley  

It's so good to hear. Not you know, not that someone left because that that's always tough. It happens. It's a part of business, and it's very normal. But that even when those things happen, it can be smooth. And I've experienced that in my business. So glad to hear that you're experiencing that as well. And knowing that, you know, the systems and the process to hire and the project management system being in place, and all of those things made that just smooth.

Allana Robinson  

Yeah, well, I mean, you saw the tailspin, I went into just hiring. And I didn't know how to do that effectively. And in 2019, actually, long before I hooked up with you. I had gone through what I call my Euro VAs from hell, where I was just hiring people and hiring people, and they ghost me and the work wouldn't happen. And so I ended up doing it and I'd hire somebody new and they wouldn't do the work. And they went through like six or seven VAs in a year, which seemed astronomical, and still does. Because I didn't know what I was doing.

Kathryn Binkley  

What do you think the difference is between the way that you hired before and the way that I taught you to go through the hiring process that made a difference?

Allana Robinson  

I used to hire off of my gut, which turns out is wrong. I have a very good sense of people socially. And I think, in my brain, I was like, Oh, well, I'll have a good feeling about the people that I'm hiring, based off of how we're interacting. And so I would hire people that I liked personally, and that I could got a good vibe off of personally, and not necessarily off with their qualifications or their ability to do the job. I was hiring them off of the faith that because I liked them, they would rise to the occasion. That's not an effective way. All

Kathryn Binkley  

right, I actually you saying that I remember the coaching call that you came to where you mentioned, like you had someone, you had a few, you narrowed it down to a few people. And there was one you were leaning towards. And you said you really liked her. And that's like, I remember like at that moment, even following the processes, so came down to you having to let go of the idea that that was the primary thing. Now I'll tell everyone listening, that can still be a piece that can be one factor to have that connection. But why don't you even share a little bit about the process of then what I had to do to narrow down and compare them?

Allana Robinson  

Yeah, well, you basically told me to create a rubric of the different things I needed in a team member. And one of those items on the rubric was how much I personally connected with them. And so like in that instance, where I think I had three that I had narrowed it down to, and there was one that I really connected with, then the other two, I was like, you seem like nice enough people, but I don't want to have a chat with you on a regular basis. And so that was able to in that instance, then take that one line item in the rubric and give that girl a 10 in those areas, and the others of five. But then when it came down to it, when I was looking at the totals across all of the different things that I needed, her personality did not outweigh the other deficit. And so ended up going with a different team member. And what I've realized now, even though we never did click personally, we never did have that personal connection, and I still fight or it did before she left, I found it very difficult to have conversations with her. She was competent, like she was able to do the job. And I found that that lack of friendship, for lack of a better word, made it easier to manage her because I didn't feel like I had to pussyfoot around her feelings. I didn't feel like I was like having to be like, Hey, I know we're bugs. But you actually do need to submit these things on time. I was able to just be like, Hey, where's this and manage them and keep it all business and not insert my personal feelings into it. So I appreciate it have been your support with that. Because I would have if it had just been me, I would have hired the chick that I liked the best. And she wouldn't have done a good job. And I would have been rehiring again six months later. And she didn't leave in the end because of any problems or anything. Her personal circumstances changed. So it was an act she was with me for almost a year. So and in the end, it turns out that my other assistant who I also hired using the same process was more capable to take on those hours. So I didn't end up losing a team member in that sense. I just had one team member who was more committed and able to take on more than I was giving her so it was nice to be able to do that objectively and not get so caught up in my emotions about it. Because you know my I've got my two babies but then my business is my other baby. It's the only one that really needs me a whole lot. Like the other two are in school now and they got lives and friends and shit. And this is what I'm spending all day doing is nurturing my business, and it's so easy to get so caught up in your emotions and, you know, helping it walk that you forget that this isn't also your social circle.

Kathryn Binkley  

Yeah, tell me how that same thing that you just said is true and other areas. So not getting caught up in your emotions, and really looking at it, like a business. What other areas? Is that true? Outside of team?

Allana Robinson  

Yeah, like, even the software's that we use, we recently, we, I recently went through a strong audit of like, moving pieces that we had in our business. And we were hemorrhaging money on some software's that, yeah, they were helpful, but they, we didn't really need them. And we were able to find cheaper alternatives that did critical functions just as well. But I was emotionally attached to those things. Because a lot of them were software's that I had started using early on in the business when it was just me. And there were fewer options. And I had spent, you know, weeks, sometimes months researching them. And so I was like, oh, like, this is my buddy, it's a software. It's my buddy, and it served me well. And you know, you feel this loyalty towards this robot that helps you out. And so it was, again, I was able to make that rubric and be like, these are the different software's that we're using. These are the different things I needed to do. Which one of these is going to perform well, and one of those line items was the fuzzy feelings I get, because I've been using it the familiarity that I have with it. But that, Does that justify the way higher price tag? Turns out? No. It's just that whole concept of objectively evaluating decisions based off of a list of factors. And I had a really hard time at first coming up with those, what those factors would be, like, across hiring software, even program changes, I've applied it to where, you know, you have all of these clients being like, Hey, can you update this? Hey, this didn't make sense. Hey, can you do a video on that? And because it's a membership? I'm like, Yeah, I'll do I'll, I want to do all of it. But what's the highest priority? And is the highest priority, necessarily what people are most vocal about what they want? No, actually, it's not. So it was, again, I've applied it to that area to where I listed off all the things that I needed to improve upon or update, and instead of getting overwhelmed by it, and just letting it stagnate, because that's what I do. When I get overwhelmed, I just go fuck it and I walk off, they won't deal with it, I was able to sit down and put all of those things on a spreadsheet and create a rubric for what the different factors are that meant that should be updated or improved or created. And then actually evaluate all of those factors for each one. And that made like, we have a roadmap now where I can actually say, Hey, you can expect this to happen in July, because that's where it falls on the ranking of things. And like I know, my personal capacity, like right now is to really update one factor of the program a month. So I'm now able to look at that roadmap and go, Okay, that's not actually going to get done until July. And I don't feel panicked about it. Because I have this objective view of really, how important is it to have that update done? Or to have that creative? So it's applied across a lot?

Kathryn Binkley  

Yeah, I love that. I'm so glad it served you so well in all of his areas. Another area that I just want to touch on, briefly, is numbers, and data and financials because we spent some time together on that. And it's an area that most CEOs that I know that start to work with me really avoid. They don't love the numbers. And I know that that's been true for you. That hasn't been your favorite.

Allana Robinson  

So yeah, well, I'm actually it's, it's a learning disability that I have just calculated. So I don't see numbers accurately. And the relationship between numbers makes less than zero sense to me. And, again, that was one of those things of what gets you here will not get you there. Where up until I hit $100,000. I was like, okay, as long as I'm not spending more money than I bring in, like most basic math, this number is bigger than that number. We're good. There's less, there's more money coming in and there's money going out. That's all I cared about until we got to 100,000 and then it was like, oh, okay, there's, there's a lot more to it than that. And I can't use those numbers strategically, personally, because I can't see those numbers. And I didn't see the relationship between the numbers. And so it's, it was wonderful having you kind of go over those numbers with me because you can see the relationship to numbers that just doesn't appear in my brain. But it also helped me like when I was, again, looking at what I was going to hire and who I was going to hire and what the priority was, at the end of the year, I actually had like, all of the different roles that I needed to fill that I figured out with you. And you know, we create that organization map where you kind of have your name, and obviously, you don't currently have somebody and there was a lot. But as one of my goals for this year was to fill in one or two of those spots. And so I was like, there's a lot of them. So which one? Which one am I going to focus on first, what's going to pry? What am I going to prioritize here? And so I did the whole rubric thing again. And I was able to figure that Yeah, okay. Having a CFO is going to be somewhat critical for me, because I can't do numbers on my own. And dealing with anything financial beyond number A is bigger than number B is too much for my brain. So I was able to like be like, Okay, well, yes, I would like to have another assistant to take on some more admin stuff. But it's probably going to benefit the business overall, or I know it's going to business benefit the business overall, because it came up on the rubric to have that person in that CFO position. So I was able to hire a fractional CFO, and like, actually have conversations with her. So that I have somebody who is constantly looking at those numbers, and able to alert me to problems, and tell me what the different numbers mean. And it took a while to find one because I'm sure most financial professionals are aware that they talk in jargon. And they, they expect other people to see the relationship with numbers that they do. So I had to find somebody who could talk about numbers in a non number way, suit my brain, which took a bit but again, I was able to do that hiring process and have that rubric. And I had, I think six different CPAs that I was considering and that I scored them in different ways. And now that one with like, able to break down difficult concepts and relationships between numbers, in a non math way, was a heavily weighted column, because that was really something that I need. But I was able to make that objective decision. And then when I had to make that hiring decision, I wasn't like, oh, this works out. Like I knew she was that girl for the job.

Kathryn Binkley  

I love that you found someone to support you in that role, which is what so many CEOs, I think need to find you don't have to be naturally great with numbers, you can even just completely hate numbers if you want to. But it doesn't mean you can avoid them. I see you raising your hand over there. And so you learn that you can't avoid them. So let's find a way to make it work.

Allana Robinson  

Make them easier. 

Kathryn Binkley  

Yeah, make it easier, so good. 

Allana Robinson  

And it's funny, because that's what I teach parents to do. Not with finances, specifically, but like when I'm looking at parents and kids who are having behavior problems, and they're like, Oh, well, they're like hitting. And you're like, Okay, well they need to hit. It's not something you can avoid, what can they hit? What can we find an acceptable way to make this thing, right? And it's but it's the same concept here where it's like, okay, I need to deal with numbers. I can't just not deal with numbers. It's, I'm running a business, like I have to have, you know, CRA to deal with and I have I have, money to deal with. So how can I deal with the numbers without personally having to deal with?

Kathryn Binkley  

So at this point, of course, you've crossed the six figure mark, you are continuing to grow, you've got your sights set on seven figures. What are you thinking about now? What's at the top of, you know, what's on? Like, just what's on your brain? What are you thinking about as the CEO of your business day in, day out week in week out?

Allana Robinson  

At this point, I have been able to mostly step back and take on those higher level kind of strategic bits where I'm looking at the structure of the program and updates that need to be done to actually coaching my clients. And that kind of day to day operations, client facing operations, bit of things. Whereas pretty much all the other roles are being dealt with by somebody who is an expert in that role, and is able to competently do it and be able to look more at the business side of things and the decisions that need to be made to grow the business and to make the business more profitable, versus like, what am I going to do a real lot. I have a personnel who tells me what to do a real on. So I'm still showing up on social media, obviously, and like, it's my face, I'm the face of the business, I'm always going to be the face of the business, I'm not going to ever be able to take myself out of that completely because of that. But I'm not managing it anymore. I'm not having to call the shots in those areas anymore. And it's really nice to be able to focus most of my energy on the people I want to serve versus all the weeds.

Kathryn Binkley  

Thank you so much for joining me and for sharing all of that, I think you're such an inspiration for everyone listening, just showing them what is possible. And if you're just at six figures, and you're feeling overwhelmed and burnt out, know that there are options, and there are opportunities to handle and manage the business in a different way. As you grow. You don't have to keep doing things the same way. Allana has been a great example of that today.

Allana Robinson  

You get too close to your own business, right? Like you become myopic, and the whole like, this is my business. And this is how it's run and having you being able to kind of grab you by the shirt collar and haul you back so that you can see the big picture again, that is the game changer. And I think the worst thing anybody can do and why I tried to avoid it and why I hooked up with you and started following your processes because I was getting myopic. Right. I didn't know what to do next. So thank you for showing me what to do.

Kathryn Binkley  

You're so very welcome. Why don't you tell everybody where they can find you where they connect, how they can learn about more of what you do. 

Allana Robinson  

Yeah, so I have a podcast called The Mud Room. It's available on iTunes, Google Play. Anywhere that podcasts, Spotify, the whole nine yards. I have a Facebook group called the Parenting Posse, which is now officially 10,000 members strong. And on Instagram. I'm also @parentingposse. and my website is allanarobinson.com. Alanna has two L's one N.

Kathryn Binkley  

Awesome, and you've kind of class a free class that they can go watch as well. Who is that best for? And where did they go to find out about that? 

Allana Robinson  

Yeah, if you have a child between the age of two and six years old, and you are at the end of your rope with their behavior, and you just don't know what else to do, especially if you maybe talk to a doctor or a psychologist, and you've basically been told to parent better. And you would if you knew what that meant, you're obviously doing the best that you know how that's who my free class is for. And you can find that by going to my website. There's a big orange button right at the top that says free class. Click on that and it's all there.

Kathryn Binkley  

Awesome. We'll link it all up in the show notes as well. Thanks again for joining me so glad to catch up with you and to have you share your experience.

Allana Robinson  

Thank you so much for having me.

Kathryn Binkley  

Hey, if you're ready to Scale to Seven®, I want to invite you to join the Scale to Seven® Mastermind. It's my coaching program designed to turn your online business into a self-sustaining scalable business that can generate millions. Just head over to kathrynbinkley.com/scale-to-seven. We'll see you inside!

 

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